Challenges of coping with relapse after quitting drugs

Challenges of coping with relapse after quitting drugs

Relapse is defined as a return to drug use after an attempt to quit. It is common for people in recovery from substance abuse to experience one or more relapses. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, up to 40 to 60 percent of people in recovery may experience a relapse.

While relapse is a common occurrence, it cannot be easy to cope with. After all, quitting drugs is a big accomplishment. So, when relapse happens, it can be easy to feel like you’ve failed. Several factors can cause a relapse. These include things like stress, triggers, and even boredom. It’s important to be aware of the challenges that can lead to relapse so that you can be prepared to deal with them.

This article will highlight some challenges of coping with relapse after quitting drugs and the way forward.

1. The shame and guilt associated with relapse

One of the biggest challenges of coping with relapse is the shame and guilt that comes along with it. It’s easy to feel like you’ve let yourself and your loved ones down when you relapse. You may even feel like you’re a failure.

These feelings can be especially tough to deal with if you’ve been in recovery for a while. You may have felt like you had things under control and that relapse was no longer an issue. But, when it happens, it can be a huge setback.

It’s important to remember that relapse is common, and it doesn’t mean you’re a failure. It’s okay to feel upset and frustrated, but try to avoid beating yourself up over it.

However, you can always seek help from professionals to talk about the guilt and shame you’re feeling. It can be an extremely helpful way to deal with these emotions. Facilities such as the Delphi health group offer excellent resources for those in recovery. They also provide support for family and friends.

2. The physical symptoms associated with relapse

Another challenge of coping with relapse is the physical symptoms that come along with it. When you relapse, your body may react in several different ways.

For instance, you may experience withdrawal symptoms if you’ve been in recovery for a while. Your body has become used to not having the drug in its system.

Withdrawal symptoms can be different for everyone and range from mild to severe, including anxiety, depression, and irritability.

Additionally, you may also experience cravings when you relapse. Cravings are intense desires to use drugs or alcohol. They can be physical or mental, and they can be very difficult to resist.

3. The emotional toll of relapse

In addition to the physical symptoms, relapse can also take an emotional toll. Addiction is a disease that affects your body and your mind.

When you’re in recovery, you’re working on healing addiction’s damage to your life. So, when you relapse, it can be easy to feel like you’ve undone all your progress.

It can be a very difficult thing to cope with. It’s important to remember that relapse is a part of the disease. It doesn’t mean that you’re a bad person or failed.

4. The financial impact of relapse

Another challenge of coping with relapse is the financial impact it can have. It is because addiction can be very expensive.

If you’re in recovery, you may have been working on getting your finances on track. But, when you relapse, you may find yourself spending money on drugs or alcohol instead of bills or other essentials.

It can be difficult to deal with, but there are ways to get back on track. You can talk to your therapist or sponsor about what you’re going through. They may be able to help you develop a budget or find other resources to help you get back on track.

5. The impact on your relationships

A relapse can also harm your relationships. Addiction can damage trust, communication, and intimacy in a relationship.

When you relapse, it’s important, to be honest with your loved ones about what’s going on. They may be understanding and supportive or need some time to process what’s happened.

Either way, it’s important to communicate with them and let them know what you’re going through.

If you’re struggling to cope with a relapse, many resources help you. You can talk to your therapist, sponsor, or doctor. Many support groups are available to help you through this difficult time. Remember, you’re not alone, and there is help available.

6. How to prevent relapse

The best way to cope with relapse is to prevent it from happening in the first place. There are many things you can do to reduce your risk of relapse.

Some of the things you can do include:

• Attending regular therapy sessions

• Going to support groups

• Staying active in your recovery

• Practicing self-care

• Managing stress

• Avoiding triggers

If you do relapse, it’s important to remember that it’s not a failure. It’s a part of the disease. You can get back on track by reaching out for help and support. Many people will be there to help you through this difficult time.

7. Try to be positive

One important thing to remember when you’re coping with relapse is to try to be positive. It can be difficult, but it’s important to remember that relapse is a part of the disease.

It doesn’t mean that you’re a bad person or failed. It’s important to reach out for help and support if you relapse. Many people will be there to help you through this difficult time.

8. Do not give up

It is also very important not to give up. Just because you have had a relapse, it does not mean that you are a lost cause.

It is important to remember that relapse is a part of the disease. You can get back on track by reaching out for help and support. Many people will be there to help you through this difficult time.

Key points

Relapse is a common challenge that people face in recovery. It can be difficult to cope with, but it’s important to remember that it’s a part of the disease. You can do many things to prevent relapse, such as attending therapy, going to support groups, and practicing self-care. If you do relapse, it’s important to reach out for help. Many people and resources are available to help you through this difficult time.

Challenges of coping with relapse after quitting drugs
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